Having started 2 startups in the last 3 years, I’ve come to benefit greatly from understanding and reading material from the venture capital realm. Even with the most brilliant of ideas to launch a new venture, no amount of planning or selling will overcome the habits that some entrepreneurs inadvertantly do in their projects. The habits in question pertain to keeping morale up in the arduous times of stress and tension that come with bootstrapping and even with seed-funded startups. The key is not to stress and ensure you can take small steps and small wins instead of looking too far ahead. For nearly everything in life it’s a good idea to consider the value of all your actions, decisions and habits and reconsider them to improve your yourself to both survive and prosper.

Enterpreneurs are faced with potentially monumental hurdles in their way such as overcoming threats from competitors and keeping the ‘bloat afloat’ when it comes to capital and operational stability. Many times startups have ended up failing within a few years due to any number of reasons. These are big risks we take as entrepreneurs, and we can’t just ignore the climate in the office or people’s morale.

An recent article on CNN Money talks about particular habit that I just recently overcame due to a suggestion from my good friend @paullyvenne. Paully hinted to me that I had an unknowing habit of saying ‘no’ in many of my responses to people’s statements, even if I was agreeing with them! I did not believe him at first, but then I noticed it.

From that point on I recognized it and did my best to avoid this habit. I suggest you read this article in case you’re worried that you have these habits. They really apply to anyone, not just for leaders or entrepreneurs.

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